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PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 6:18 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 20, 2008 11:40 pm
Posts: 13
Here are the Continental Currency notes of the January 14th, 1779 Resolution:

January 14th, 1779 $4:

SN 69041

Signed by D(aniel) Wister in red ink and R(obert) Cather in black ink. The emblem on the front shows an acanthus plant with a large weighted pot or basket pressing it down, however the acanthus leaves grow up around the pot. Above is the motto: DEPRESSA RESURGIT (Having been pressed down, it rises up again). The nature print on the back is of a tansy.

Freidberg #CC-87

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January 14th, 1779 $2:

SN: 112207

Signed by J(ohn Jr.) Graff in red ink and by D(aniel) Wister of Philadelphia (1738-1805) in black ink. The emblem in front shows grain being threshed with a flail with the motto: TRIBULATIO DITAT (It is enriched by affliction). The nature print on the back is of a mulberry leaf. Watermarked UNITED/STATES on two lines and orientated to be read from the front

Friedberg #CC-88

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January 14th, 1779 $3:

The edges of this note are not the greatest. ...but the signature of Jacob Graff (see below) should catch your eye.

SN: 97100

Signed by Jos(eph) Watkins in red ink and by J(aco)b Graff in black. The emblem on the front depicts and eagle fighting a heron with the motto: EXITUS IN DUBIO EST (The outcome is in doubt). On the back is a nature print of rose leaves.

Friedberg #CC-89

At the corner of 7th and Market Streets in Philadelphia is the site of the Jacob Graff House, where the Declaration of Independence was written. It was reconstructed for the 1976 Bicentennial celebration. Jacob Graff, a bricklayer, built the house in 1775. It was a small brick dwelling, 16 by 50 feet, with two rooms on each floor and a center stairway. In one of his rented rooms on the second floor Jefferson worked from June 10 to June 28, 1776 to draft the document that was to change the world.

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January 14th, 1779 $4:

SN: 110427

Signed by R(obert) Cather in red ink and by D(aniel) Wister of Philadelphia (1738-1805) in black ink. The emblem in front shows a wild boar charging into a spear with the motto: AUT MORS AUT VITA DECORA (Either death or an honorable life). The nature print on the back is of a mulberry leaf. Watermarked UNITED/STATES on two lines and orientated to be read from the front.

Friedberg #CC-90

PMG EF-45

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January 14th, 1779 $5:

SN: 51898

Signed by P(atrick) Ferrall in red ink and C(ornelius) Comegys in black ink. The emblem in front shows a hand in a bush bleeding from pricks from the thorns. It has the motto: SUSTINE VEL ABSTINE. Ben Franklin explained this motto to mean “Bear with me, or let me alone; or thus, Either support or leave.” The bush is believed to mean America, the bleeding hand is Britain. The nature print on the back is of feverfew.

Friedberg #CC-91

PMG AU-53

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January 14th, 1779 $20:

SN: 105914

Signed by J(acob) Graff in red ink and D(aniel) Wister in black ink. The emblem on the front shows a strong wind creating waves, with the motto: VI CONCITATAE (It assaults with a violent force). The nature print on the back is of a grape leaf.

Friedberg #CC-82

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January 14th, 1779 $30:

SN 179588

Signed by D(aniel) Wister of Philadelphia (1738-1805) in red ink and Jo(hn) Gardner of Rhode Island (1747-1808), member of the Continental Congress. Wreath on a tomb, with the motto: SI RECTE FACIES (If you act righteously). A portion of the emblem is printed in red ink. The nature print on the back is a sprig of climbing fumitory.

Friedberg #CC-93

PCGS AU-53

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January 14th, 1779 $35:

SN: 123332

Signed by J(ohn) Leacock in red ink and N(athaniel) Donnell in black ink. A field with a plough, this tinted in orange, legend above HINC OPES (Hence our wealth); with orange protector at left end. The nature print on the back consists of two willow leaves.

Friedberg #CC-94

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January 14th, 1779 $40:

SN: 127467

Signed by I(saac) Gray in red ink and J(acob) Masoner in black ink. The emblem in front shows the rays of an all seeing eye shining down on what appears to be a sacrificial alter with a flame that is surrounded by thirteen stars, below is the motto: CONFEDERATION. The nature print on the back is of poterium.

Friedberg #CC-95

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January 14th, 1779 $45:

SN 40066

Signed by P(atrick) Ferrall in red ink and C(ornelius) Comegys in black ink. The emblem on the front shows beehives in a shed surrounded by the motto: SIC FLORET RESPUBLICA (Let the Republic Flourish). The nature print on the back is of ground ivy. The paper is watermarked “CONFEDE/RATION” on two lines and oriented to be read from the front.

Friedberg #CC-96

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January 14th, 1779 $50:

SN: 40385

Signed by P(atrick) Ferrall in red ink and C(ornelius) Comegys in black ink. The emblem in front shows a thirteen-stepped pyramid with the motto: PERENNIS (Everlasting). The nature print on the back is of parsley.

Friedberg #CC-97

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January 14th, 1779 $55:

SN 166891

Signed by J(ohn) Leacock in red and N(athaniel) Donnell in black. The emblem on the front shows the sun coming out after a storm, with the motto: POST NUBILA PHOEBUS (After dark clouds comes the sun). The nature print on the back is of a willow leaf and a poison hemlock. The paper is watermarked “CONFEDE/RATION” on two lines and oriented to be read from the front.

Friedberg #CC-98

PMG AU-58

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January 14th, 1779 $60:

SN: 33817

Signed in red by Wm. Stretch and in black by Jno. (John) Leacock. The emblem on the front shows a globe of the earth with a motto from Psalm 97: DEUS REGNAT EXULTET TERRA (God reigns, let the earth rejoice). The nature print on the back displays a willow leaf and a sprig of hemlock. The paper is watermarked CONFEDE/RATION on two lines and orientated to be read from the front.

Friedberg #CC-99

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January 14th, 1779 $65:

SN: 71617

Signed by Paul Cox in red ink and by N(athaniel Donnell in black ink. The emblem on the front shows a hand holding the scales of justice with the motto "FIAT JUSTITIA" (Let there be justice). The nature print on the back is a sprig of parsley. The paper is watermarked "CONFEDE / RATION" on two lines and oriented to be read from the front.

Friedberg #CC-100

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January 14th, 1779 $70:

SN 26983

Signed by Jacob Graff and M(ichael) Kimmell in red ink. A fertile tree stands alone off the Earth, legend VIM PROCELLARIUM QUADRENNIUM SUSTINUIT (For four years it has withstood the force of the storm); with orange protector at left end. The nature print on the back displays a maple leaf.

Freidberg #CC-101

PCGS AU-50

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This is the highest denomination note of the last issue of the Continental Currency notes.

January 14th, 1779 $80:

SN 77131

Signed by D(aniel) Wister in red and R(obert) Cather in black. The emblem on the front shows a large tree with the motto: ET IN SECULA SECULORUM FLORESCEBIT (And it will flourish throughout the ages). The nature print on the back is of a strawberry leaf. The paper is watermarked “UNITED/STATES” on two lines and oriented to be read from the front.

Friedberg #CC-102

Uncertified Choice About New

NOTE: In 1779 $80 may have sounded like a lot of money.

Wrong!!! It was not.

Remember the phrase: "Not worth a Continental?"

In January 1779 the depreciation had reached 7.42. $80 divided by 7.42 means it would buy $10.78 worth of goods. Just a year before in January 1778 the rate was 1.46 - $80 would buy $54.79 worth of goods. (In January 1777 it was $1 to $1)

By October 1779 the depreciation had reached 20.4. You could now buy $3.92 worth of goods with your $80 note.

In January 1780 it had reached a depreciation rate of 29.4

By a March 18, 1780 Resolution of the Continental Congress these notes were exchanged at a rate of $40 to $1.

No more Continental notes were printed after that.

The economy was in trouble. I am not a military historian, but me thinks the French came along to help "The Good Guys" win in just the nick of time.

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